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A REFLECTION ON THE CONCERT

Venue: The Baxter Concert Hall

Wednesday 4th March 2015 at 8.15p.m.

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There is nothing quite like the joy of experiencing an audience standing to applaud and cheer at the end of a concert. Such was the joy experienced in the Baxter Concert Hall at the conclusion of our performance there last night under the baton of Alexander Fokkens – our Musical Director.

I have never been one for taking things apart to see how they work. And so I have no intention of posing as an analyst of the many facets and dynamics that go into the performance of concert items. But I feel I can share some understanding of how much such an enlivening and soul-enhancing concert came to be such.

By choosing, out of the three works on the programme, to give first performances of two in Cape Town, was in itself an act  of daring – knowing just how conservative Cape Town audiences can be. The two first Cape Town performance items were: Mendelssohn”s Piano concerto in A minor and Cape Town composer Grant McLachlan”s Cantata Darius and the Den.

Pianist Reese Barkhuizen and the orchestra gave a hugely satisfying reading of the Mendelssohn, as did the orchestra with choir and soloists of the McLachlan Cantata.

I suppose the “bait” for the audience was the inclusion of the Beethoven Choral  Fantasia for piano, soloists and orchestra with Reese Barkuizen again at the piano, and with soloists Levi Alexander, Janine Abrahams, Grant McLachlan; and Amanda Osorio, Marco Titus and Riaan Hunter – who were also the solists in the Darius Cantata.

Now, to comment on the music-making:

At the heart of it  all was heart! – the heart of the conductor Alexander Fokkens.

He was not only knowlingly and creatively bringing each composition to life via the orchestra and the pianist and the singers, but, aware that an integral part of any public performance is casino online the audience, he achieved that most desirable of  achievements – the bonding of the audience into the framework of the whole through every note brought  to life by way of his conducting.

The centrality of his musicianship held both performers and audience in an amazing and tangible unity as each work unfolded  to the final climax of joyful sound at the conclusion of the Beethoven Choral  Fantasia.

Concerts such as last night”s do not just happen.They are the outcome of hours of hard work. And Alexander is no stranger to hard work.

His appreciation of the forces at his disposal and command is always evident in rehearsal. . What a fascinating collection of individuals!

Alexander would be the first to acknowledge that the success of the eveninng would not  have been possible without the co-operation of each and every individual on stage.

It requires a huge amount of patience and humility to  work with such a diverse body  of individuals and to be able to mould them into a unified performing body of musicians.

This he achieved. I believe it was for all an incredible joy to feel such a deep sense of belonging together as we made the evening”s music under his baton. And to feel the very essence of the compositions performed come to fruition as from a heart pumping life-blood into every note.

No mean expression of the audience”s appreciation was evident in the amount they donated at interval towards a fund for the fire-fighters who have so valiantly been confronting the tragic fires raging through the  Pensinsula over the past few days. An amount of over R8600 was collected.

HARRY WIGGETT

Fish Hoek